00:00
06:02
In a bleak and chilly December day, Zhu Ling, a Chinese woman, breathed her final breath in a hospital located in Beijing. Once a brilliant and captivating student at Tsinghua University, often referred to as "China's MIT," Zhu succumbed to complications arising from brain cancer at the age of 50.

Her health struggles commenced several decades earlier with an enigmatic illness that eventually became the foundation of one of the most enduring and widely discussed true crime narratives in recent Chinese history. At the time of her demise, Zhu was not merely a victim of an unresolved poisoning case. She had transformed into a cultural symbol for Chinese individuals worldwide, representing political corruption, the influence of trivial grudges, and the emergence of China's internet.

Her tale commenced in late 1994 when, as a junior at Tsinghua, Zhu suddenly began experiencing stomach pains and hair loss, indicative of a debilitating illness. A prodigy in chemistry and a gifted musician proficient in playing the piano and the Chinese guqin, a plucked seven-string instrument, she fell into a coma and was confined to a hospital bed. Her doctors at Peking Union Medical College Hospital, one of China's leading medical institutions, were perplexed.

Reference - Audrey Jiajia Li is a journalist and nonfiction writer living in Singapore.
In a bleak and chilly December day, Zhu Ling, a Chinese woman, breathed her final breath in a hospital located in Beijing. Once a brilliant and captivating student at Tsinghua University, often referred to as "China's MIT," Zhu succumbed to complications arising from brain cancer at the age of 50. Her health struggles commenced several decades earlier with an enigmatic illness that eventually became the foundation of one of the most enduring and widely discussed true crime narratives in recent Chinese history. At the time of her demise, Zhu was not merely a victim of an unresolved poisoning case. She had transformed into a cultural symbol for Chinese individuals worldwide, representing political corruption, the influence of trivial grudges, and the emergence of China's internet. Her tale commenced in late 1994 when, as a junior at Tsinghua, Zhu suddenly began experiencing stomach pains and hair loss, indicative of a debilitating illness. A prodigy in chemistry and a gifted musician proficient in playing the piano and the Chinese guqin, a plucked seven-string instrument, she fell into a coma and was confined to a hospital bed. Her doctors at Peking Union Medical College Hospital, one of China's leading medical institutions, were perplexed. Reference - Audrey Jiajia Li is a journalist and nonfiction writer living in Singapore. leer más leer menos

hace 3 meses #china, #crimeblog, #forensicfiles, #ling, #missingpersons, #murdermystery, #serialkillers, #taiwan, #truecrime, #truecrimenews, #truecrimepodcast, #zhu