S2E2 - Learning Disability and Mental Health, with Paul Wilshaw

7 de feb. de 2024 · 23m 57s
S2E2 - Learning Disability and Mental Health, with Paul Wilshaw
Descripción

Why is mental health and learning disability so often confused? How do they interact? Why are learning disabled people more likely to experience mental health problems than the general population?...

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Why is mental health and learning disability so often confused? How do they interact? Why are learning disabled people more likely to experience mental health problems than the general population?

In this episode, we will be talking to Paul Wilshaw, who is Associate Producer at https://www.mind-the-gap.org.uk/. As well as being an advocate for Mind the Gap, Paul uses his own lived experience to be an advocate for learning disabled people. Paul is also presenter of Mind the Gap and Disability Arts Online’s podcast, https://disabilityarts.online/projects/the-disability-and-podcast/

Again, we make quite a few references to websites and research in this show. Here are the links!

The connections between mental health and learning disability according to https://www.mencap.org.uk/learning-disability-explained/research-and-statistics/health/mental-health and https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/guides-to-support-and-services/learning-disability-support/.

Some research suggests that learning disabled people are more than twice as likely to experience a mental health problem than the population at large: see results on https://consensus.app/results/?q=Are%20learning%20disabled%20people%20more%20likely%20to%20have%20mental%20health%20problems%20than%20non-learning%20disabled%20people?&synthesize=on

Disabled people are more at risk of loneliness than non-learning disabled people: ses results on https://consensus.app/results/?q=Are%20disabled%20people%20at%20higher%20risk%20of%20loneliness%20than%20non-disabled%20people%3F&synthesize=on

Follow @livelymindspod on X, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and more athttps://www.bio.link/livelyminds

Please note that this show does not constitute medical advice and is not a replacement for seeking professional help. You can find our more about the show and get signposting to support on our websitehttps://www.anyamedia.net/livelyminds

--Show Transcript--

W: Hi everyone, the following episode includes a brief reference to suicidal ideation and a potentially triggering comment made by a healthcare professional who is not identified in the conversation. There are also quite a few references to research again and you’ll find links in the show notes. Please take care whilst listening and for signposting to support, visit our website anyamedia.net/LivelyMinds W: Hello, my name is Will. E: And my name is Ellie. W: You are listening to Lively Minds, the podcast about mental health challenges that go beyond the ebb and flow of the everyday. E: The podcast that looks at how developing our understanding of mental health issues influences the ways that we address them. W: Before we get going with today’s episode, we just want to say a big thank you to the person who gave us a very generous anonymous donation at our Buy Me a Coffee page. You know who you are. It’s very much appreciated. If you’d like to support the show too, then you can find our Buy Me A Coffee page at buymeacoffee.com/livelyminds. [Music] E: In today’s episode we are talking about the interconnections and misconceptions surroundingmental health and learning disability.  W: According to the charities Mind and Mencap, learning disability and mental health are often muddled. At the same time, some studies show that learning disabled people are at least twice as likely to struggle with their mental health than the population at large. E: To guide us through this topic, we are delighted to welcome Paul Wilshaw to the show. Paul is an associate producer at Mind the Gap Theatre Company. His role includes supporting the company’s producing team and project delivery. As well as being an advocate for Mind the Gap, Paul uses his own lived experience to be an advocate for learning disabled people. Paul is also presenter of Mind the Gap and Disability Arts Online’s podcast, Disability and… I always want to say the dot dot dot. W: Welcome to the show Paul. P: Thank you very much for having me. Really do appreciate it. W: I guess we should start off just by saying that Ellie and I both know you outside of this podcast, known you for a while and it’s just really great to actually finally be able to have you on the show. E: Definitely. P: It’s great and I know Ellie from We Shall Not Be Removed and that was a great experience, except for, wish we didn’t have to go through that experience in the first place but we did. E: Yeah W: Just to explain that We Shall Not Be Removed was the Disability Arts Alliance that came together during the pandemic to try and work out how we could have a better landscape for disabled artists during and most importantly, following the pandemic as well, right? E: Yeah,  P: definitely. E: Simultaneously it feels like it was ages ago that me and Paul were seeing each other on Zoom all the time, but actually it also in a way feels like it was like a month ago. P: I know. W: So Paul, thanks for coming and talking to us. To start off with, as I mentioned in the intro, according to both Mencap and Mind, Mencap being a charity that works with learning disabled people, Mind being a charity that focuses on mental health, learning disability and mental healthare often confused. So, we were wondering, do you agree with that? And if so, why do you think that is? P: I think it, it does get confused. A lot of the times that you can’t actually tell what part is of you, what part is your learning disability and also what part is your mental health. And if, if you don’t understand it yourself, then in a way, how can you expect other people to understand it. So I mean, I have depression, I got diagnosed with that, but I’ve also got learning disabilities and cerebral palsy. So what part of my personality is my learning disability, what part is it my mental health, and what part of it is my cerebral palsy?. It’s a really hard thing to understand in myself, so I do understand why people get confused. I think though people do get confused, I think it’s also that fear that people have of the unknown and the fact of that there’s so much now being in the media around mental health, and people are trying to understand their mental health but also trying to understand have I got this disability? or is that part of my disability? And that sometimes, it’s hard to actually know yourself. So yeah, no, I think there is definitely some confusion, but I think there’s, people are trying to understand more, well I’m hoping so anyway. E: It’s hard trying to figure out which bits which isn’t it? And then at the end of the thought you’re like, well, actually it’s just sort of all the bits, a bit like a jigsaw or something.  P: Yeah, you have to put it all together. I think it’s also that thing of that everyone’s scared, but also there is fun around having your disability and having your mental health because there is fun in that.  E: Yeah.  P: I think that’s something that people are like, how can that be fun? How is that fun? But you can’t just, you’re not always down.  E: Yeah P: And I think that’s a thing that people just think, oh, if you’ve got depression, or if you’ve got this, you’re always down. It’s not always the case. It’s also that support that you have in place as well.  E: Yeah. W: Can I ask Paul, if I had to put you on the spot and say, have you thought about what might be some differences between mental health and learning disability? P: I think my mental health fluctuates and I try not to use jargon words. So what I mean is it goes up and down. My learning disability is there all my life.  E: Yeah P: It’s the best way I can describe it. My learning disability, I learn different from and I need support. With my mental health, I get support but it’s not as easy. And sadly, I’m one of those people that probably tries to cover up and puts a face on stuff too much. And what I’ve started to realise more recently is that people know when my cerebral palsy is playing me up because I’m shifty and all that. And I’m, but with my mental health, only a few people will recognize when I’m going through one of my situations. W: mmm P: I think, yeah, there’s so much. So, no, there’s no, I think what mind and mencap put is very honest and say that it’s not the same thing because it’s not. And not, I mean, not one person will have the same situation. I mean, my situation is different than other people with mental health situations, but you need to be there to support everyone. And so, yeah. E: Yeah. P: And something that Mencap do talk about is how one of the problems about the confusion is that sometimes a learning disabled person might go to their doctor, and the doctor will just assume that whatever they’re presenting is part of their learning disability, whereas in actual fact, it could well be a mental health issue. And the other thing they mentioned as well is that sometimes there can be a lack of connection between mental health and learning disability services within health as well, and a lack of coordination. P: A prime example of the doctors and stuff is that I went to my doctor ... continued here
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Autor Ellie Page & Will Sadler
Organización Will Sadler
Página web www.anyamedia.net
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