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Alzheimer's and Leqembi: What we Know So Far

  • Alzheimer's and Leqembi: What we Know So Far

    2 NOV. 2023 · Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is the most common cause of dementia. It is characterized by the loss of neurons and synapses in the brain, which leads to a decline in cognitive function and memory. Leqembi (lecanemab) is a monoclonal antibody that has been shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials. It was approved by the FDA on June 6, 2023, for the treatment of people with mild cognitive impairment or early Alzheimer's disease. Leqembi works by binding to beta-amyloid, a protein that forms plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. These plaques are thought to play a role in the progression of the disease. By binding to beta-amyloid, Leqembi helps to reduce the amount of plaque in the brain and slow the progression of the disease. In clinical trials, Leqembi was shown to reduce the rate of cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease by 27%. It was also shown to be safe and well-tolerated. Leqembi is the first FDA-approved drug that has been shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease. It is a significant breakthrough in the treatment of this devastating disease. However, there has been some controversy with the FDA's approval of Leqembi. First, some experts have raised concerns about the clinical trials that were conducted to test Leqembi. The trials were relatively small, and they were not designed to show whether Leqembi could improve patients' quality of life or help them to live longer. Second, Leqembi has been associated with some serious side effects, including brain swelling and bleeding. These side effects are more common in people who have two copies of the APOE4 gene, a gene that is linked to Alzheimer's disease. Third, Leqembi is very expensive. The drug is expected to cost around $28,000 per year. This has raised concerns about access to the drug, particularly for people who are not insured or who have limited financial resources. Despite these concerns, some experts believe that Leqembi represents a significant advance in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. They argue that the drug can provide meaningful benefits to patients, even if it does not cure the disease. Overall, the FDA's approval of Leqembi is a complex issue with pros and cons. It is important to weigh the potential benefits of the drug against the risks and costs before making a decision about whether to use it. If you have any concerns about Leqembi, please talk to your doctor. They can help you to weigh the risks and benefits of the drug and decide if it is right for you. Thanks for listening to Quiet Please. Remember to like and share wherever you get your podcasts.
    2m 41s

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is the most common cause of dementia. It is characterized by the loss of neurons and synapses in the brain, which leads...

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Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is the most common cause of dementia. It is characterized by the loss of neurons and synapses in the brain, which leads to a decline in cognitive function and memory. Leqembi (lecanemab) is a monoclonal antibody that has been shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials. It was approved by the FDA on June 6, 2023, for the treatment of people with mild cognitive impairment or early Alzheimer's disease. Leqembi works by binding to beta-amyloid, a protein that forms plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. These plaques are thought to play a role in the progression of the disease. By binding to beta-amyloid, Leqembi helps to reduce the amount of plaque in the brain and slow the progression of the disease. In clinical trials, Leqembi was shown to reduce the rate of cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease by 27%. It was also shown to be safe and well-tolerated. Leqembi is the first FDA-approved drug that has been shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease. It is a significant breakthrough in the treatment of this devastating disease. However, there has been some controversy with the FDA's approval of Leqembi. First, some experts have raised concerns about the clinical trials that were conducted to test Leqembi. The trials were relatively small, and they were not designed to show whether Leqembi could improve patients' quality of life or help them to live longer. Second, Leqembi has been associated with some serious side effects, including brain swelling and bleeding. These side effects are more common in people who have two copies of the APOE4 gene, a gene that is linked to Alzheimer's disease. Third, Leqembi is very expensive. The drug is expected to cost around $28,000 per year. This has raised concerns about access to the drug, particularly for people who are not insured or who have limited financial resources. Despite these concerns, some experts believe that Leqembi represents a significant advance in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. They argue that the drug can provide meaningful benefits to patients, even if it does not cure the disease. Overall, the FDA's approval of Leqembi is a complex issue with pros and cons. It is important to weigh the potential benefits of the drug against the risks and costs before making a decision about whether to use it. If you have any concerns about Leqembi, please talk to your doctor. They can help you to weigh the risks and benefits of the drug and decide if it is right for you. Thanks for listening to Quiet Please. Remember to like and share wherever you get your podcasts.
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