Portada del podcast

Cervical Cancer The Silent Killer

    ASK THE BLOODDETECTIVE PODCAST- ON MOST PODCAST PLATFORMS Dr. Michael Wald Chappaqua, NY - 1-hr north of NYC 914-552-1442 mailto:info@blooddetective.com http://www.DrMichaelWald.com Cervical Cancer: The Silent Killer & Natural Approaches Cervical...

    mostra más
    ASK THE BLOODDETECTIVE PODCAST- ON MOST PODCAST PLATFORMS Dr. Michael Wald Chappaqua, NY - 1-hr north of NYC 914-552-1442 mailto:info@blooddetective.com http://www.DrMichaelWald.com

    Cervical Cancer: The Silent Killer & Natural Approaches

    Cervical dysplasia, metaplasia, and cervical cancer are serious health issues that affect women worldwide, and the United States is no exception. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), in 2022, an estimated 13,170 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed in the US, and about 4,290 women will die from the disease.
    Cervical dysplasia is a precancerous condition that occurs when abnormal cells are found on the cervix. These cells can be detected through Pap tests, which are recommended for women between the ages of 21 and 65. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2019, there were approximately 460,000 cases of cervical dysplasia diagnosed in the US.
    Cervical metaplasia is a condition where the cells lining the cervix change from the normal squamous cells to glandular cells. This can be a precursor to cervical dysplasia and cancer.
    Cervical cancer is a malignant tumor that develops in the cervix. It is most commonly diagnosed in women between the ages of 35 and 55. According to the ACS, in 2022, an estimated 13,170 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed in the US, and about 4,290 women will die from the disease. The 5-year survival rate for cervical cancer is about 65%, which is higher for women who are diagnosed with early-stage cancer.
    The risk factors for cervical dysplasia, metaplasia, and cancer include:
    1. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: HPV is a common sexually transmitted virus that can cause cervical dysplasia and cancer. 2. Smoking: Smoking can weaken the immune system and increase the risk of HPV infection. 3. Poor diet: A diet low in fruits and vegetables and high in processed foods may increase the risk of cervical dysplasia and cancer. 4. Lack of Pap tests: Pap tests can detect abnormal cells in the cervix before they become cancerous. 5. Family history: Women with a family history of cervical cancer may be at higher risk.
    To reduce the risk of cervical dysplasia, metaplasia, and cancer, women can take the following steps:
    1. Get regular Pap tests: Pap tests can detect abnormal cells in the cervix before they become cancerous. 2. Get the HPV vaccine: The HPV vaccine can protect against the types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers. 3. Practice safe sex: Using condoms and dental dams can reduce the risk of HPV infection. 4. Quit smoking: Smoking can weaken the immune system and increase the risk of HPV infection. 5. Eat a healthy diet: A diet rich in fruits and vegetables and low in processed foods may reduce the risk of cervical dysplasia and cancer.
    In conclusion, cervical dysplasia, metaplasia, and cancer are serious health issues that affect women in the US. Understanding the risk factors and taking steps to reduce the risk can help prevent these conditions. It is important for women to get regular Pap tests and the HPV vaccine, practice safe sex, quit smoking, and eat a healthy diet to reduce their risk of developing cervical dysplasia, metaplasia, and cancer.
    Cervical dysplasia, also known as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), refers to the abnormal growth of cells on the surface of the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina. It is a precancerous condition that can progress to cervical cancer if left untreated. Cervical dysplasia is typically detected through a Pap smear or human papillomavirus (HPV) test.
    The development of cervical dysplasia is closely associated with persistent infection by certain types of HPV, particularly high-risk strains such as HPV-16 and HPV-18. These viruses are transmitted through sexual contact. When HPV infects the cells of the cervix, it can cause changes in their structure and function, leading to dysplasia.
    Cervical dysplasia is classified into three grades based on the extent of abnormal cell growth:
    1. CIN 1: This grade indicates mild dysplasia, where only a small portion of cells show abnormal changes. CIN 1 often resolves on its own without treatment, but regular monitoring is recommended.
    2. CIN 2: Moderate dysplasia characterizes CIN 2, with a larger proportion of cells displaying abnormal features. Treatment is usually recommended for CIN 2 to prevent progression to more severe dysplasia or cervical cancer.
    3. CIN 3: Severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ is represented by CIN 3, where nearly all cells exhibit abnormal characteristics. CIN 3 has a high likelihood of progressing to invasive cervical cancer if not treated promptly.
    Cervical cancer is a malignant tumor that develops in the cervix. It typically arises from the transformation of abnormal cervical cells caused by persistent HPV infection. Cervical cancer is one of the most common types of cancer affecting women worldwide, but it can be prevented through regular screening and vaccination against high-risk HPV strains.
    The progression from cervical dysplasia to invasive cervical cancer usually occurs over a long period, often taking several years. During this time, precancerous lesions may gradually become more severe and eventually invade deeper layers of the cervix and surrounding tissues. If left untreated, cervical cancer can spread to other parts of the body through metastasis.
    Early-stage cervical cancer may not cause noticeable symptoms, which underscores the importance of regular screenings. As the disease progresses, symptoms may include abnormal vaginal bleeding (e.g., between periods or after intercourse), pelvic pain, pain during sexual intercourse, and unusual vaginal discharge.
    Treatment options for cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer depend on various factors such as the stage of the disease, age, overall health, and desire for future fertility. Common approaches include surgical removal of abnormal tissue or the entire uterus (hysterectomy), radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.




    Treatment: The treatment approach for cervical dysplasia, metaplasia, and cervical cancer depends on several factors including the severity of the condition, age of the patient, desire for future fertility, and overall health status. The following are some common treatment options:
    1. Watchful Waiting: In cases where mild dysplasia or metaplasia is detected, close monitoring without immediate intervention may be recommended. Regular follow-up visits and repeat Pap smears are performed to ensure that the condition does not progress. 2. Medications: For certain cases of cervical dysplasia caused by high-risk HPV, topical medications such as imiquimod or trichloroacetic acid (TCA) may be prescribed. These medications work by stimulating the immune system or causing cell destruction, respectively. 3. Surgical Procedures: - Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP): LEEP is a common surgical procedure used to remove abnormal cervical tissue. A thin wire loop with an electrical current is used to cut away the affected area. - Cone Biopsy: In cases where dysplasia extends deeper into the cervix, a cone biopsy may be performed. This procedure involves removing a cone-shaped piece of tissue from the cervix for further examination. - Hysterectomy: In more advanced cases of cervical cancer or when other treatments have been unsuccessful, a hysterectomy may be recommended. This surgical procedure involves removing the uterus and sometimes surrounding structures.
    It is important to note that each case is unique, and treatment decisions should be made in consultation with a healthcare provider based on individual circumstances.

    Nutritional Issues That May Predispose to Cervical Cancer & Target Underlying DNA damage

    👉 Different herbs, vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids can have a significant impact on DNA damage and repair in individuals with cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer. Some herbs, such as green tea and turmeric, have been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can help protect against DNA damage caused by free radicals and inflammation. For example, a study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry found that green tea extract reduced DNA damage in human cervical cancer cells. Similarly, curcumin, a compound found in turmeric, has been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can help protect against DNA damage and promote DNA repair.
    Vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, E, and selenium, are also important for DNA damage and repair. Vitamin C is essential for the function of the enzyme topoisomerase II, which is involved in DNA replication and repair. Selenium is an essential trace element that is involved in the function of various enzymes involved in DNA metabolism, including topoisomerase II. A deficiency in these vitamins and minerals can impair DNA repair and increase the risk of DNA damage and mutations.
    Fatty acids, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, have also been shown to have a role in DNA damage and repair. Omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish oil supplements, have been shown to reduce inflammation and promote the expression of genes involved in DNA repair. A study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry found that omega-3 fatty acid supplementation reduced DNA damage in human cervical cancer cells.

    Specific Nutritional Connections
    While nutrition alone may not directly cause the
    mostra menos
    Contactos
    Información

    Parece que no tienes ningún episodio activo

    Echa un ojo al catálogo de Spreaker para descubrir nuevos contenidos.

    Actual

    Portada del podcast

    Parece que no tienes ningún episodio en cola

    Echa un ojo al catálogo de Spreaker para descubrir nuevos contenidos.

    Siguiente

    Portada del episodio Portada del episodio

    Cuánto silencio hay aquí...

    ¡Es hora de descubrir nuevos episodios!

    Descubre
    Tu librería
    Busca