• Earthquake NYC !

    5 ABR. 2024 · There was an earthquake on the East Coast this morning! It struck near Lebanon, New Jersey, which is about 45 miles west of here in New York City. The earthquake was a 4.8 magnitude, the strongest the Northeast has felt in over a decade according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Thankfully, there haven't been any reports of major damage or injuries. The shaking was felt from Maryland all the way up to Maine, though! Officials are still checking things out, but Mayor Adams says New Yorkers can go about their regular day. The East Coast of the United States is not typically associated with high seismic activity, but the region has experienced several notable earthquakes throughout its history. Here is a brief overview of some significant earthquakes that have occurred along the East Coast: 1. Cape Ann Earthquake (1755): This earthquake, estimated to have been between 6.0 and 6.3 in magnitude, struck off the coast of Massachusetts. It caused damage to buildings in Boston and was felt as far away as South Carolina and Montreal, Canada. 2. New Madrid Earthquakes (1811-1812): Although not directly on the East Coast, this series of earthquakes, ranging from 7.0 to 8.0 in magnitude, were felt along the East Coast and caused significant damage in the Mississippi Valley region. 3. Charleston Earthquake (1886): This 7.3 magnitude earthquake struck near Charleston, South Carolina, causing widespread damage and killing at least 60 people. It remains one of the largest and most destructive earthquakes to have occurred on the East Coast. 4. Giles County, Virginia Earthquake (1897): This 5.9 magnitude earthquake was felt across 12 states and caused damage to buildings and chimneys in Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland. 5. New York City Earthquake (1884): A 5.5 magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of New York City, causing minor damage and alarming residents. 6. Central Virginia Earthquake (2011): This 5.8 magnitude earthquake was centered near Mineral, Virginia, and was felt across the East Coast, causing minor damage to buildings, including the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C. While the East Coast experiences fewer and less severe earthquakes compared to other regions like the West Coast, there is still the potential for damaging seismic events due to the presence of ancient fault lines and geological structures in the region. Thanks for listening to Quiet Please. Remember to like and share wherever you get your podcasts.
    2m 27s

There was an earthquake on the East Coast this morning! It struck near Lebanon, New Jersey, which is about 45 miles west of here in New York City. The earthquake...

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There was an earthquake on the East Coast this morning! It struck near Lebanon, New Jersey, which is about 45 miles west of here in New York City. The earthquake was a 4.8 magnitude, the strongest the Northeast has felt in over a decade according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Thankfully, there haven't been any reports of major damage or injuries. The shaking was felt from Maryland all the way up to Maine, though! Officials are still checking things out, but Mayor Adams says New Yorkers can go about their regular day.
The East Coast of the United States is not typically associated with high seismic activity, but the region has experienced several notable earthquakes throughout its history. Here is a brief overview of some significant earthquakes that have occurred along the East Coast:
1. Cape Ann Earthquake (1755): This earthquake, estimated to have been between 6.0 and 6.3 in magnitude, struck off the coast of Massachusetts. It caused damage to buildings in Boston and was felt as far away as South Carolina and Montreal, Canada.
2. New Madrid Earthquakes (1811-1812): Although not directly on the East Coast, this series of earthquakes, ranging from 7.0 to 8.0 in magnitude, were felt along the East Coast and caused significant damage in the Mississippi Valley region.
3. Charleston Earthquake (1886): This 7.3 magnitude earthquake struck near Charleston, South Carolina, causing widespread damage and killing at least 60 people. It remains one of the largest and most destructive earthquakes to have occurred on the East Coast.
4. Giles County, Virginia Earthquake (1897): This 5.9 magnitude earthquake was felt across 12 states and caused damage to buildings and chimneys in Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland.
5. New York City Earthquake (1884): A 5.5 magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of New York City, causing minor damage and alarming residents.
6. Central Virginia Earthquake (2011): This 5.8 magnitude earthquake was centered near Mineral, Virginia, and was felt across the East Coast, causing minor damage to buildings, including the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C.
While the East Coast experiences fewer and less severe earthquakes compared to other regions like the West Coast, there is still the potential for damaging seismic events due to the presence of ancient fault lines and geological structures in the region. Thanks for listening to Quiet Please. Remember to like and share wherever you get your podcasts.
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