Portada del podcast

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

  • S27E60: Unveiling Cosmic Ancestry: The Quest for Population III Stars

    17 MAY. 2024 · Journey through the cosmic tapestry with SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 60, where we unearth the echoes of creation by discovering one of the most ancient stars ever seen in another galaxy. This remarkable find could lead us to the elusive first generation of stars that illuminated the universe from darkness to the dawn of clarity. These celestial ancestors, born from the pure elements of the Big Bang, were behemoths that lived fast and died young, leaving behind the building blocks of everything we know. The episode then shifts focus to the Hubble Space Telescope's latest challenge, as it enters safe mode due to a gyroscope glitch. Despite the setback, the iconic observatory's legacy of over three decades of celestial observations remains unshaken as NASA seeks a solution. Next, we launch into the story of Snoopy, a CubeSat deployed from the International Space Station. This six-unit CubeSat embarks on a mission to measure soil moisture and improve agricultural yields by harnessing signals from commercial satellites. For an exploration of these cosmic milestones and more, tune into SpaceTime with Stuart Gary. Join us as we navigate the universe's past, present, and future, revealing the wonders that lie beyond the night sky. (00:00) NASA's Hubble space telescope goes offline following a gyroscope issue (00:43) Astronomers have discovered one of the most ancient stars ever seen in another galaxy (06:49) NASAS Hubble Space Telescope enters safe mode due to gyroscopic issue (09:09) A new CubeSat called Snoopy has been launched from the ISS (13:41) Long term daily use of aspirin could help slow and even prevent colorectal cancer (20:09) Some people have been comparing this festival to the Wicker man film Support the show and access ad-free episodes at https://www.spreaker.com/show/spacetime. Follow our cosmic conversations on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the mysteries of the universe, one episode at a time. This episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Secure your digital journey across the cosmos with a password manager you can trust. Find your stellar security solution at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass.. Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app and follow us on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook.
    24m 33s
  • S27E59: Venus's Vanishing Vapors: The Mystery of a Bone-Dry Planet

    15 MAY. 2024 · Embark on an interplanetary journey with SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 59, where we unravel the enigmatic atmosphere of Venus and its waterless environment. Discover the startling new study that suggests Venus lost its water reserves to space, leaving it with a mere fraction of Earth's water despite their similar origins. The episode dives into the complex chemical reactions in Venus's atmosphere that may have turned a once Earth-like planet into a scorching, inhospitable world. Next, we explore the innovative ideas NASA is considering for future lunar logistics, including a magnetic railroad system designed to transport materials across the Moon's surface. This system could revolutionize the way we build and sustain lunar bases, pushing the boundaries of off-world construction and resource utilization. The episode then shifts to the launch of a cutting-edge satellite from the International Space Station. This new eye in the sky aims to provide early warnings of volcanic eruptions by detecting trace gases, a game-changer for disaster preparedness and environmental monitoring. Join us as we delve into these cosmic developments and more, including the implications of AI biases and the latest in tech from Apple. Tune into SpaceTime with Stuart Gary for a deep dive into the latest astronomical insights and technological advancements. (00:00) This is spacetime series 27, episode 59, for broadcast on 15 May 2024 (00:42) Study claims Venus loses twice as much water every day through dissociative recombination (06:16) NASA is looking at building a railway on the moon to transport freight (16:23) Ultra processed junk foods associated with higher risk of premature death, study finds (18:52) Apple has formally released its new Apple Air and Apple Pro iPads (24:15) Spacetime is available every Monday, Wednesday and Friday through Apple podcasts Support the show and access ad-free episodes at https://www.spreaker.com/show/spacetime. Follow our cosmic conversations on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the mysteries of the universe, one episode at a time. This episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Secure your digital journey across the cosmos with a password manager you can trust. Find your stellar security solution at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass. Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app and follow us on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook.
    25m 50s
  • S27E58: Earth's Fading Shield: The Magnetic Trigger for Life's Diversity

    13 MAY. 2024 · Embark on a cosmic expedition with SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 58, where we delve into the mysteries of Earth’s ancient magnetic field and its role in the diversification of life.  Join us as we explore a pivotal period over half a billion years ago when a weakening magnetic shield may have paved the way for a dramatic increase in atmospheric oxygen, fostering the rise of complex organisms and setting the stage for human evolution. The episode then accelerates into the realm of supermassive black holes, whose voracious energy output is revealed to be even more influential than once thought. With the help of the Webb Space Telescope, scientists uncover the hidden power of black holes to rapidly quench star formation, effectively turning vibrant galaxies into cosmic graveyards. Finally, we witness the ambitious ascent of China’s Chang'e 6 lunar sample return mission, aiming to harvest the first-ever samples from the far side of the Moon. This daring venture could provide unprecedented insights into the Moon's enigmatic history and even propel China to the forefront of Martian soil retrieval. For a journey through these profound astronomical discoveries, tune into SpaceTime with Stuart Gary. Traverse the celestial currents and uncover the secrets of the universe, one episode at a time. (00:00) This is spacetime series 27, episode 58, for broadcast on 13 May 2024 (00:49) A reduction in Earth's magnetic field may have triggered diversification (04:11) New study shows supermassive black holes can shut off star formation in big galaxies (15:32) China has successfully launched its Changi six sample return mission (19:29) A new study claims consuming olive oil reduces dementia risk in women (23:44) The Westall UFO incident took place in 1966 near Melbourne's Westall school (30:01) Spacetime is available every Monday, Wednesday and Friday through various podcasting platforms Support the show and access ad-free episodes at https://www.spreaker.com/show/spacetime.  Follow our cosmic conversations on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the mysteries of the universe, one episode at a time. This episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Secure your digital journey across the cosmos with a password manager you can trust. Find your stellar security solution at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass. Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app and follow us on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook.
    31m 56s
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    S27E58-60 Premium: The Magnetic Mysteries of Life's Evolution: Earth's Weakening Field and the Oxygen Boom

    13 MAY. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 58 *How a weak magnetic field may have supported the diversification of life on Earth A new study has found that an unusual reduction in the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field may have triggered the diversification of life on Earth. *The power of black holes even greater than previously estimated A new study has shown how quickly erupting supermassive black holes can shut off star formation in big galaxies. *China's Chang'e-6 Lunar Mission blasts off China has successfully launched its Chang'e-6 sample return mission which will attempt to collect the first lunar rocks from the far side of the Moon. *The Science Report Olive oil linked to a lower risk of dementia-related death An additional 4.7 billion people to be at risk of malaria and dengue due to climate change. Artificial intelligence shown to lie, make stuff up and now trick people Skeptics guide to the Westall UFO sighting   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 59 *Why Venus has almost no water A new study claims Earth’s scalding and uninhabitable sister planet Venus became incredibly dry after losing much of its atmospheric hydrogen into space through a process called dissociative recombination. *A space railroad on the moon NASA is looking at building a railway on the Moon to transport freight across the lunar surface. *New volcanic eruption early warning satellite launched A new satellite has been launched from the International Space Station to study volcanic activity from orbit. *The Science Report Ultra-processed junk foods, especially processed meats, associated with a higher risk of dying early. A new carbon-negative concrete AI showing clear racist and woke programming Alex on tech: New I-pads released   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 60 *One of the most ancient stars ever seen in another galaxy Astronomers have discovered one of the most ancient stars ever seen in another galaxy. *NASA's Hubble pauses science due to gyro issue NASA’s Hubble space telescope is back in operation after suddenly entering safe mode last month due to an ongoing gyroscope issue. *SNOOPI launched into orbit A new CubeSat has been launched from the International Space Station. *The Science Report Long-term daily aspirin use could help slow and prevent the progression of colorectal cancer Chimpanzees learn to improve their tool use as they age The first known example of a wild animal using a plant with medicinal properties to treat a wound   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/   This week’s guests include: Rebecca Davies from Swinburne University Robert Wright, director of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology at the University of Hawaiʻi Professor James Garrison, professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Purdue University and principal investigator for SNoOPI And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics Jonathan Nally from Sky and Telescope Magazine   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordPass deal here ➼ https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass . The discount is incredible! And it’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌   Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link:  https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen and access show links via https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ
    Reproducir
    1h 17m 17s
  • S27E57: Rewriting Cosmic History: The Surprising Growth of Early Galaxies

    10 MAY. 2024 · Embark on a celestial odyssey with SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 57, where we unravel the rapid evolution of spiral galaxies. Our cosmic journey begins over 10 billion years ago, as new observations from the Webb Space Telescope reveal the early formation of star bars. These stellar structures, pivotal in the maturation of galaxies, were once thought to emerge in a chaotic young universe. Yet, they now appear to have developed far sooner, indicating a surprisingly orderly galactic evolution. The episode takes an unexpected turn as we delve into the moon's dramatic geological past. Discover how our lunar companion turned itself inside out, reshaping its surface with titanium-rich lava flows. The tale unfolds through a blend of computer simulations and spacecraft observations, shedding light on the moon's enigmatic lopsided geology. As we return to Earth, we witness the changing of the guard aboard China's Tiangong space station. The Shenzhou 17 crew's safe return after six months in orbit paves the way for the Shenzhou 18 team to continue exploring the frontiers of science in microgravity, including the intriguing endeavor of raising fish in the void. Concluding our cosmic survey, we gaze upon the night sky's wonders in the May edition of Skywatch. Marvel at the constellation Scorpius, the radiant Antares, and the Eta Aquarids meteor shower—a celestial spectacle born from the remnants of Halley's Comet. For a comprehensive voyage through these astronomical discoveries, visit https://www.spacetimewithstuartgary.com and support the show at https://www.spreaker.com/show/spacetime. Immerse yourself in the wonders of the universe with SpaceTime. This episode is brought to you by NordPass. Secure your digital life as you traverse the vast expanse of space with a password manager you can trust. Visit https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass to learn more. Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app and follow us on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the cosmos, one episode at a time. (00:00) New observations show galaxies evolved much faster than previously thought (00:43) New study suggests early galaxies evolved much faster than previously thought (12:46) In greek mythology, the constellation was named after Scorpius (23:39) Short period comet will make its next close up appearance in 2061 (26:21) It's actually a good time for stargazing this time of the year (29:20) Many stars in the night sky are multiple stars, right (31:11) During mid evening, the constellation Scorpius will poke its nose up over the horizon (32:40) Jupiter is too close to the sun to be seen this month (33:59) Spacetime is available every Monday, Wednesday and Friday through Apple podcastsThis episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Safeguard your digital journey across the infinite expanse with a password manager you can count on. Secure your celestial navigation at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass. Tune into SpaceTime on your preferred podcast app and follow us on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Become a patron for exclusive access to ad-free episodes and special content: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/supportt.
    35m 56s
  • S27E56: Saturn's Geyser Moon Mysteries: Tidal Forces and Life's Potential

    8 MAY. 2024 · Embark on an interstellar odyssey with SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 56, where we delve into the enigmatic geysers of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus. Unravel the mystery behind these spectacular jets as new research draws parallels with Earth's own San Andreas Fault, suggesting a strike-slip motion akin to our tectonic shifts may be powering these icy eruptions. Discover how this celestial phenomenon could hold the keys to conditions ripe for life beneath Enceladus's frozen crust. The episode then shifts to the dusty red plains of Mars, where NASA scientists brace for the onslaught of solar storms as our Sun approaches its fiery peak. Learn how the absence of a protective magnetic field on Mars presents a unique opportunity to observe the effects of solar radiation on the Martian surface and the implications for future human explorers. In an unexpected twist, we recount the tale of space junk from the International Space Station making an unwelcome visit to a Florida home, reminding us of the ever-present dance between our orbital endeavors and the pull of Earth's gravity. Join us as we navigate these cosmic currents and more, including the potential impact of solar and dust storms on Mars's ancient watery past and the measures being taken to protect future missions from the Sun's wrath. For a voyage through the latest in space exploration and the intricacies of our solar system, tune into SpaceTime with Stuart Gary. Navigate the celestial highways with us and become part of a journey that transcends our earthly bounds. Support the show and access ad-free episodes at https://www.spreaker.com/show/spacetime. Follow our cosmic conversations on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the mysteries of the universe, one episode at a time. (00:00) Stuart Garry brings you the latest in spacetime series 27 (00:46) New study suggests tiger stripes on Enceladus may control geyser activity (06:45) NASA scientists studying how solar storms and radiation will affect Mars in the future (14:08) Scientists confirm that space junk slammed into a Florida home last month (16:13) New research warns that older adults who lose sense of smell may lose mobility faster (19:08) Apple is expected to announce its new iPads this week with M four chips (21:06) Spacetime is available every Monday, Wednesday and Friday through Apple PodcastsThis episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Secure your digital journey across the cosmos with a password manager you can trust. Find your stellar security solution at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass. Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app and follow us on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook.
    23m 2s
  • S27E55: Martian Mysteries: Curiosity Uncovers Clues to Ancient Earth-Like Conditions

    6 MAY. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 55 *New findings point to an Earth-like environment on ancient Mars A new study using data from NASA’s Mars curiosity rover suggests there was once an Earth-like environment on ancient Mars. *Could purple be the new green in search for alien life A new study suggests that life on other planets with different atmospheres and orbiting different types of stars wouldn’t display Earth like forests of green. *HyImpulse’s SR75 rocket blasts off Germany’s HyImpulse has successfully launched its SR75 sounding rocket on a test flight from Southern Launch’s Koonibba Test Range west of Ceduna on South Australia’s west coast. *The Science Report Being vegetarian is linked to a much slower progression of prostate cancer. A new way of cleaning up per-and poly-Fluro-alkyls – the so called forever chemicals. Why do people prefer their alcoholic beverages cold. Skeptics guide to when psychics say the Russian invasion of Ukraine will end. https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/   This week’s guests include: Lígia Fonseca Coelho from Cornell university Associate professor Lisa Kaltenegger from Cornell University Shannon Curry from the University of Colorado boulder and principal scientist for NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN spacecraft MAVEN   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics Jonathan Nally from Sky and Telescope Magazine   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordPass deal here ➼ https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass . The discount is incredible! And it’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌   Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link:  https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen and access show links via https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ Additionally, listeners can support the podcast and gain access to bonus content by becoming a SpaceTime crew member through http://www.bitesz.supercast.com or through premium versions on Spotify and Apple Podcasts. Details on our website at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com For yur daily dose of Space and Astronomy News, check out Astronomy Daily the Podcast. Available wherever you get podcasts. Or listen and get details from our website at https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/
    22m 56s
  • Supporters Club

    S27E55-57 Premium: The Martian Chronicles: Tracing the Waterways of Ancient Mars

    6 MAY. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 55 *New findings point to an Earth-like environment on ancient Mars A new study using data from NASA’s Mars curiosity rover suggests there was once an Earth-like environment on ancient Mars. *Could purple be the new green in search for alien life A new study suggests that life on other planets with different atmospheres and orbiting different types of stars wouldn’t display Earth like forests of green. *HyImpulse’s SR75 rocket blasts off Germany’s HyImpulse has successfully launched its SR75 sounding rocket on a test flight from Southern Launch’s Koonibba Test Range west of Ceduna on South Australia’s west coast. *The Science Report Being vegetarian is linked to a much slower progression of prostate cancer. A new way of cleaning up per-and poly-Fluro-alkyls – the so called forever chemicals. Why do people prefer their alcoholic beverages cold. Skeptics guide to when psychics say the Russian invasion of Ukraine will end.   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 56 *Enceladus geysers erupt through strike–slip motion A new study suggests that the spectacular geysers erupting from the Saturnian moon Enceladus’ south pole tiger strips are caused by the same process which triggers California’s San Andreas fault. *NASA scientists gear up for solar storms at Mars As the Sun’s activity continues to ramp up as it approaches Solar Max – the climax of its eleven-year solar cycle – scientists with NASA are preparing to observe how the increase in solar storms and radiation could affect equipment and humans on the Red Planet Mars. *NASA confirms space junk slammed into a Florida home NASA has confirmed that an object which crashed into a Florida home last month was a chunk of space junk jettisoned from the International Space Station. *The Science Report Older adults who begin to lose their sense of smell are more likely to lose their mobility faster. A self-digesting plastic which could help reduce plastic pollution. Teens who spend too much time online are more likely to skip school. Alex on Tech New i-Pads with AI capabilities on-device.   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 57 *New observations show galaxies evolved much faster than previously thought A new study suggests that star bars found in the centre of many spiral galaxies including our own Milky Way, indicate that early galaxies evolved much faster than previously thought. *How the moon turned itself inside out A new study combining computer simulations and spacecraft data is helping to explain the long-standing mystery surrounding the Moon's lopsided geology. *New crew takes over China’s space station China's Shenzhou 17 taikonauts have returned safely to Earth after spending six months aboard Beijing’s Tiangong space station. *May Skywatch We explore the constellation Scorpius, the spectacular M6 and M7 open star clusters and the Eta-Aquarids meteor shower produced by Halley’s Comet in the May edition of Skywatch.   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/   This week’s guests include: Lígia Fonseca Coelho from Cornell university Associate professor Lisa Kaltenegger from Cornell University Shannon Curry from the University of Colorado boulder and principal scientist for NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN spacecraft MAVEN   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics Jonathan Nally from Sky and Telescope Magazine   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordPass deal here ➼ https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass . The discount is incredible! And it’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌
    Reproducir
    1h 16m 50s
  • S27E54: Earth's Ancient Shield: Unearthing the Origins of Our Magnetic Field

    3 MAY. 2024 · Dive into the cosmic depths with SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 54, where we journey back 3.7 billion years to uncover the oldest evidence of Earth's magnetic field. Join us as we explore pristine ancient rocks from Greenland, revealing a magnetic strength similar to today's, and potentially extending the known age of our planet's protective shield by hundreds of millions of years. This discovery could illuminate the early conditions that fostered life on Earth and the enduring power source behind our magnetic field. The volcanic spectacle continues as we venture to Jupiter's moon Io, unveiling that it has been a hotbed of volcanic activity for its entire 4.57 billion-year existence. The sulfur and chlorine isotopes in Io's atmosphere, analyzed through the Alma radio telescope, attest to a history of relentless eruptions powered by Jupiter's immense gravitational pull. Witness the marvels of the solar corona as we recap the scientific endeavors during the recent solar eclipse that graced North America. From sounding rockets to high-altitude jets, scientists harnessed this celestial event to probe the enigmatic corona, seeking to solve the mystery of its intense heat and its role in geomagnetic storms that affect our increasingly tech-dependent world. And in a turn towards Earthly concerns, we discuss the unsettling findings that nearly half of China's major coastal cities are sinking, posing a threat to millions. For a comprehensive voyage through these astronomical discoveries and terrestrial challenges, visit https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com and support the show at https://www.spreaker.com/show/spacetime. Immerse yourself in the wonders of the universe with SpaceTime. This episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Safeguard your digital journey across the infinite expanse with a password manager you can count on. Secure your celestial navigation at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass Tune into SpaceTime on your preferred podcast app and follow us on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Become a patron for exclusive access to ad-free episodes and special content: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/spacetime-with-stuart-gary--2458531/support.
    24m 8s
  • S27E53: Methane on Mars and Io's Infernos: Uncovering Cosmic Mysteries

    1 MAY. 2024 · Embark on an interplanetary investigation with SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 53, as we delve into the perplexing presence of methane on Mars. The red planet's mysterious emissions have puzzled scientists for years, with seasonal spikes and unpredictable behavior sparking debates on their origin. Could biological activity be the source, or are geological interactions to blame? Join us as we explore a new hypothesis that suggests Mars' own soil could be sealing and sporadically releasing this elusive gas, adding another layer to the Martian enigma. The episode ascends further into the Jovian system with an up-close encounter of the volcanic moon Io, courtesy of NASA's Juno spacecraft. Marvel at the newly discovered jagged mountain spires and tranquil lava lakes that adorn this tumultuous celestial body, revealing a landscape both violent and serene. But it's not all smooth sailing in the cosmos. We report on the unexpected hiccup faced by NASA's planet-hunting satellite TESS, which has entered safe mode, suspending its quest for new worlds beyond our solar system. What caused this sudden shutdown, and what does it mean for the future of exoplanet discovery? Plus, don't miss our Science Report, where we unearth a connection between a form of rheumatoid arthritis and gene mutations linked to blood cancer, and discuss the climatic shifts allowing tropical fish to venture into temperate Australian waters. For the full cosmic journey, visit our website at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com and support the show at https://www.spreaker.com/show/spacetime. Discover the universe's wonders with us on SpaceTime. This episode is brought to you by NordPass. Navigate the digital universe with confidence using a password manager you can trust. Secure your cosmic exploration at www.bitesz.com/nordpass. Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app and follow us on Twitter @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook.  Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/spacetime-with-stuart-gary--2458531/support. (00:00) This is spacetime series 27, episode 53, for broadcast on 1 May 2024 (00:47) New study may help explain why scientists are continuing to detect methane on Mars (08:55) NASA's Juno spacecraft has studied the volcanic moon IO during two flybys (15:45) Climate change is helping tropical fish species invade temperate Australian waters (17:24) Google AI chatbot Baird apparently hallucinated, citing a research paper that doesn't exist (19:11) Ohio based company has invented the first ever flamethrower wielding robot dogs (21:43) Spacetime is available every Monday, Wednesday and Friday through various podcast providers
    23m 39s
  • Supporters Club

    S27E58-60 Premium: The Magnetic Mysteries of Life's Evolution: Earth's Weakening Field and the Oxygen Boom

    13 MAY. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 58 *How a weak magnetic field may have supported the diversification of life on Earth A new study has found that an unusual reduction in the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field may have triggered the diversification of life on Earth. *The power of black holes even greater than previously estimated A new study has shown how quickly erupting supermassive black holes can shut off star formation in big galaxies. *China's Chang'e-6 Lunar Mission blasts off China has successfully launched its Chang'e-6 sample return mission which will attempt to collect the first lunar rocks from the far side of the Moon. *The Science Report Olive oil linked to a lower risk of dementia-related death An additional 4.7 billion people to be at risk of malaria and dengue due to climate change. Artificial intelligence shown to lie, make stuff up and now trick people Skeptics guide to the Westall UFO sighting   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 59 *Why Venus has almost no water A new study claims Earth’s scalding and uninhabitable sister planet Venus became incredibly dry after losing much of its atmospheric hydrogen into space through a process called dissociative recombination. *A space railroad on the moon NASA is looking at building a railway on the Moon to transport freight across the lunar surface. *New volcanic eruption early warning satellite launched A new satellite has been launched from the International Space Station to study volcanic activity from orbit. *The Science Report Ultra-processed junk foods, especially processed meats, associated with a higher risk of dying early. A new carbon-negative concrete AI showing clear racist and woke programming Alex on tech: New I-pads released   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 60 *One of the most ancient stars ever seen in another galaxy Astronomers have discovered one of the most ancient stars ever seen in another galaxy. *NASA's Hubble pauses science due to gyro issue NASA’s Hubble space telescope is back in operation after suddenly entering safe mode last month due to an ongoing gyroscope issue. *SNOOPI launched into orbit A new CubeSat has been launched from the International Space Station. *The Science Report Long-term daily aspirin use could help slow and prevent the progression of colorectal cancer Chimpanzees learn to improve their tool use as they age The first known example of a wild animal using a plant with medicinal properties to treat a wound   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/   This week’s guests include: Rebecca Davies from Swinburne University Robert Wright, director of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology at the University of Hawaiʻi Professor James Garrison, professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Purdue University and principal investigator for SNoOPI And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics Jonathan Nally from Sky and Telescope Magazine   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordPass deal here ➼ https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass . The discount is incredible! And it’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌   Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link:  https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen and access show links via https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ
    Reproducir
    1h 17m 17s
  • Supporters Club

    S27E55-57 Premium: The Martian Chronicles: Tracing the Waterways of Ancient Mars

    6 MAY. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 55 *New findings point to an Earth-like environment on ancient Mars A new study using data from NASA’s Mars curiosity rover suggests there was once an Earth-like environment on ancient Mars. *Could purple be the new green in search for alien life A new study suggests that life on other planets with different atmospheres and orbiting different types of stars wouldn’t display Earth like forests of green. *HyImpulse’s SR75 rocket blasts off Germany’s HyImpulse has successfully launched its SR75 sounding rocket on a test flight from Southern Launch’s Koonibba Test Range west of Ceduna on South Australia’s west coast. *The Science Report Being vegetarian is linked to a much slower progression of prostate cancer. A new way of cleaning up per-and poly-Fluro-alkyls – the so called forever chemicals. Why do people prefer their alcoholic beverages cold. Skeptics guide to when psychics say the Russian invasion of Ukraine will end.   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 56 *Enceladus geysers erupt through strike–slip motion A new study suggests that the spectacular geysers erupting from the Saturnian moon Enceladus’ south pole tiger strips are caused by the same process which triggers California’s San Andreas fault. *NASA scientists gear up for solar storms at Mars As the Sun’s activity continues to ramp up as it approaches Solar Max – the climax of its eleven-year solar cycle – scientists with NASA are preparing to observe how the increase in solar storms and radiation could affect equipment and humans on the Red Planet Mars. *NASA confirms space junk slammed into a Florida home NASA has confirmed that an object which crashed into a Florida home last month was a chunk of space junk jettisoned from the International Space Station. *The Science Report Older adults who begin to lose their sense of smell are more likely to lose their mobility faster. A self-digesting plastic which could help reduce plastic pollution. Teens who spend too much time online are more likely to skip school. Alex on Tech New i-Pads with AI capabilities on-device.   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 57 *New observations show galaxies evolved much faster than previously thought A new study suggests that star bars found in the centre of many spiral galaxies including our own Milky Way, indicate that early galaxies evolved much faster than previously thought. *How the moon turned itself inside out A new study combining computer simulations and spacecraft data is helping to explain the long-standing mystery surrounding the Moon's lopsided geology. *New crew takes over China’s space station China's Shenzhou 17 taikonauts have returned safely to Earth after spending six months aboard Beijing’s Tiangong space station. *May Skywatch We explore the constellation Scorpius, the spectacular M6 and M7 open star clusters and the Eta-Aquarids meteor shower produced by Halley’s Comet in the May edition of Skywatch.   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/   This week’s guests include: Lígia Fonseca Coelho from Cornell university Associate professor Lisa Kaltenegger from Cornell University Shannon Curry from the University of Colorado boulder and principal scientist for NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN spacecraft MAVEN   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics Jonathan Nally from Sky and Telescope Magazine   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordPass deal here ➼ https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass . The discount is incredible! And it’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌
    Reproducir
    1h 16m 50s
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    S27E49-51 Premium: The Final Flight: Delta IV Heavy's Historic Last Launch and the End of an Era

    22 ABR. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 49 *Discovery of the most massive stellar black hole in our galaxy Astronomers have identified the most massive stellar black hole yet discovered in the Milky Way galaxy. *Rewriting the evolution of white dwarf stars Astronomers have discovered a small population of white dwarf stars that have mysteriously stopped cooling. *Development of a new bigger Cygnus Cargo ship Engineers are developing a new updated version of the Cygnus Cargo ship for future supply missions to the International Space Station. *The Science Report The Bureau of Meteorology has declared the El Niño weather event of 2023-24 has finally ended. Claims drinking more than a glass of sweetened drinks daily linked to chronic kidney disease. Scientists discover the remains of what could be the largest marine reptile ever to live. Skeptics guide to Sweden’s paranormal phenomena archive   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 50 *NASA confirms its Dragonfly rotorcraft mission to Saturn's moon Titan NASA has confirmed that it will send a rotocopter mission to the organic-rich Saturnian world of Titan. *NASA say good bye for now to their Mars Ingenuity Helicopter NASA scientists have said good bye for now to their intrepid little Mars Ingenuity Helicopter which was grounded in January following rotor damage while flying over the Red planet’s Jezero Crater. *South Korea launches a new spy satellite South Korea has launched its second domestically made spy satellite into orbit *The Science Report The Great Barrier Reef now going through a fifth bleaching event due to climate change. Palaeontologists have described three unusual new species of giant fossil kangaroo. The first ever ‘World Cybercrime Index, Alex on Tech AMD rolls out its new AI-enhanced chips   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 51 *How Pluto got its heart The mystery of how Pluto got a giant heart-shaped feature on its surface has finally been solved with the cause being attributed to a giant and slow oblique-angle impact. *No gamma rays from nearby supernova The explosive death of a star in a nearby supernova last year offered astrophysicists an opportunity to test ideas about how these powerful blasts accelerate cosmic rays to super luminal speeds. *Last ever Delta rocket launch A bit of history was made this month with the last ever launch of a delta rocket. *The Science Report More than one billion people in the world are now living with obesity. Study says foods that contain resistant could help with weight loss. The new automatic toilet flushing device that only works with the lid down to keep the nasties in.   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/ This week’s guests include: Simon Blouin from the University of Victoria in British Columbia And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordPass deal here ➼ https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass . The discount is incredible! And it’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌
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    1h 13m 10s
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    S27E46-48 Premium: Cosmic Collision: The Neutron Star Black Hole Merger Mystery

    15 ABR. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 46 *A possible neutron star black hole merger detected in Gravitational Waves The LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational Wave collaboration has detected what might be either the merger of two neutron stars or even more excitingly that of a neutron star with a stellar mass black hole. *New study shows that stars often eat their own planets A new study has confirmed that at least one in every dozen stars have torn apart and consumed one of its planets. *The science from America’s solar eclipse As much of the world marvelled at last week’s total eclipse of the Sun across North America scientists were busy carrying out observations. *The Science Report Underestimating the future impact of so called forever chemical in the environment. The diabetes drug Semaglutide can also help reduce heart failure. Anthropologists discover Australia's oldest pottery, dating back to between 2000 and 3000 years ago. Skeptics guide to crackpots in high places   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 47 *Brown dwarfs are more star like than thought A new study suggests that brown dwarfs are created through the same processes as stars and not like planets. *Astronomers expecting a nova event before the end of the year Astronomers are expecting a distant star to explode in a spectacular event called a nova sometime between now and September. *The extreme starburst in galaxy M82 Astronomers have discovered that the starburst galaxy Messier 82 is manufacturing new stars some ten times faster than the Milky Way. *The Science Report Study says Homosexual behaviour may have evolved because it plays a role in social bonding. 40% of the world's coastlines saw significant increase in heatwaves and extreme sea level rise. TV, computer, and video game use by teens linked to psychotic experiences. Alex on Tech Samsung’s new mega TV with a mega price to match.       SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 48 *The most detailed view ever of the expanding universe Astronomers have released the first-year data from DESI -- the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument Survey – providing the most detailed view ever of the expanding universe. *Solar Observatory discovers its 5,000th comet On March 25, 2024, a citizen scientist in the Czech Republic spotted a comet in an image from the SOHO Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, which has now been confirmed as the 5000th Sun grazing comet discovery. *Soyuz returns to Russia with love Russia’s Soyuz MS 24 capsule has returned safely to Earth landing under blued skies on the Kazakhstan steps. *The Science Report Up to 70% of the world's wine growing regions threatened by climate change Young people with mood disorders less likely to get their driver's license and are more likely to crash. Study warns drinking 100% fruit juice is linked to weight gain in children. Skeptics guide to Avi Loeb’s alien technology claim   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/ This week’s guests include: Fan Liu from Monash University Sungrazer project principal investigator Karl Battams from the U.S. Naval Research Lab Washington, D.C..   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordPass deal here ➼ https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass . The discount is incredible! And it’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌  
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    1h 16m 21s
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    S27E43-45 Premium: Cosmic Underdogs: The Discovery of Ursa Major's Faintest Satellites

    8 ABR. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 43 *Discovery of the faintest known star system orbiting the Milky Way Astronomers have detected an ancient star system traveling around our Milky Way galaxy which has set a new record as the faintest and lowest-mass satellite galaxy ever discovered. *Bowen Orbital Spaceport open for business Australia’s first privately operated orbital launch facility has been formally opened at Abbot Point near Bowen on the Queensland tropical Pacific coast.  The complex is expected to undertake its first launch next month with a Gilmour Space Eris rocket to fly on its maiden flight. *Southern launch getting ready for its next test flight Southern Launch says its Koonibba Test Range on South Australia’s Eyre peninsula is almost ready for its next test launch in just a matter of weeks. *The Science Report Warnings that Australia could soon see megadroughts lasting over twenty years. Discovery of a strong link between Alzheimer's and the daily consumption of meat and processed foods. A new study claims the earliest dinosaurs experienced rapid growth rates. Skeptics guide belief in psychic powers   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 44 *New Clues About Mars’ Ancient Water NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover has arrived at an area in Gale Crater’s Mount Sharp that may show evidence liquid water flowed on the red planet for much longer than previously thought. *NASAs new Moon buggies NASA has selected three companies to help it develop its proposed new Moon buggy --- the lunar terrain vehicle or LTV. *The largest digital camera ever built for astronomy After two decades of work, scientists and engineers at the US Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre’s National Accelerator Laboratory have finally completed the Legacy Survey of Space and Time Camera -- The largest digital camera ever built for astronomy. *The Science Report A new study shows that high blood pressure is the leading risk factor for death. The Persian Plateau identified as pivotal for Homo sapiens migration out of Africa. Volcanoes could hold the clues to how the first building blocks of life were formed. Alex on Tech more controversy for Google   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 45 *Perseverance collects its 24th sample on Mars NASA’s Mars Perseverance Rover has just collected its 24 geological sample from the surface of the red planet.  The drill core offers new clues about Jezero Crater and the lake it may have once held. *New date set for Starliner's first manned mission NASA has set May 6 as the opening of the launch window for the first manned flight of Boeing’s long troubled CST-100 Starliner.  The flight to the International Space Station was originally slated for this month. *Space junk slams into a Florida home NASA says it’s analyzing an object that crashed into a Florida man's home last week which is suspected of being piece of debris jettisoned from the International Space Station. *The Science Report New research shows that the warming climate will turn Australia’s soil into a net emitter of carbon dioxide. A new study claims women with a low resting heart rate had a slightly higher chance of a criminal lifestyle. Identifying criminals by airborne forensic DNA evidence. Skeptics guide to African witchcraft trials   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://bitesz.com   This week’s guests include:   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics
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    1h 10m 54s
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    S27E40-42 Premium: Sagittarius A*'s Polarized Portrait: A New Era of Black Hole Science

    1 ABR. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 40 *Strong magnetic fields at the edge of Milky Way’s supermassive black hole A new image from the Event Horizon Telescope has uncovered strong organised magnetic fields spiraling around the edge of Sagittarius A* the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Milky Way Galaxy. *New studies show blue supergiant stars can be formed through stellar mergers A new study has found that some of the brightest, hottest, and most luminous stars in the universe are created by the merger of two smaller stars. *Peering Into the Tendrils of a distant galaxy The Webb space telescope has provided astronomers with a new view of a spectacular star forming region called NGC-604 deep inside the Triangulum Galaxy M-33. *Moscow sends a new crew to the International Space Station A Russian Soyuz capsule has safely docked to the International Space Station as it flew 420 kilometres above the planet. *The Science Report How spending less time sitting could help reduce blood pressure in people over 60. Scientists map the genome of sugarcane. It’s true, today’s music really isn’t as good as that back in the olden days. Skeptics guide to why people believe in astrology   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 41 *The new study that shows how Scandinavia was born in Greenland A new study looking at the oldest Scandinavian bedrock has found that it originated in Greenland. *Blue Origin's Orbital Reef Life Support System Engineers working on Blue Origin's Orbital Reef commercial space station project have completed a key testing milestone for the future orbital outposts critical life support system. *The growing role of space in monitoring Climate Change The European Union’s constellation of Copernicus Sentinel satellites make up the largest single fleet of climate change monitoring spacecraft. *Dragon delivers more supplies to the International Space Station Critical scientific experiments and technology have arrived at the International Space Station aboard NASA’s latest commercial resupply mission. *The Science Report The new implantable battery that uses the body's oxygen to deliver a stable electricity supply. The two-legged bio-hybrid robot, which uses muscle tissue to improve movement. A new report says Google interfered with US elections on at least 41 occasions since 2008. Alex on Tech Samsung AI roll out.   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 42 *Claims water persisted in Mars' Gale crater for longer than previously thought Scientists have found signs that water was abundant in Mars' Gale crater long after the planet was thought to have become dry and inhospitable. *The Sun’s spectacular double solar flare The Sun has become increasingly active over the past week with an almost continuous display of solar flare activity including a spectacular double solar flare event described as the most powerful eruption since 2017. *Is Aurora real after all There are persistent reports that the Pentagon has developed and is now testing a successor to the famous A-12 -- SR-71 Blackbird --the world’s fastest jet. *April Skywatch Our nearest neighbouring star system Alpha Centauri -- the iconic constellation Southern Cross -- and the annual Lyrids meteor shower are among the highlights of the April night skies on SkyWatch.   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://bitesz.com   This week’s guests include: WEBB senior Project Scientist Jane Rigby   Josef Aschbacher, Director of ESA Earth Observation Programs   Michael Rast, ESA’s Earth Observation Senior Advisor.   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics Jonathan Nally from Sky and Telescope Magazine   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordVPN deal here ➼ https://nordvpn.com/stuartgary or use the checkout code STUARTGARY. It’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌   Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link:  https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen and access show links via https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ
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    1h 48m 13s
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    S27E37-39 Premium: Through Hubble's Eyes: Deciphering Jupiter's Atmospheric Anomalies

    26 MAR. 2024 · The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 37 *A new spin on the red supergiant star Betelgeuse A new study suggests that evidence of a faster than expected rotation observed in the red supergiant star Betelgeuse could instead be its violently boiling surface. *How asteroid and comet bombardment changed the Moon forever A new study has found that the Earth’s moon may have been subjected to far more asteroid comet and meteor impact events than previously thought. *Electron’s first NRO launch from Wallops Island Rocket Lab have finally undertaken their first Electron mission for the United States National Reconnaissance Office from their new launch complex at NASA’s Wallops Island flight Facility on the Virginian mid Atlantic coast. *The Science Report Climate change smashes records for greenhouse gas levels, temperatures and sea level rise. Studies show people aren’t getting enough sleep. Is Havana Syndrome all in your head. Skeptics guide to secret women’s business   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 38 *Scientists captures the end of the planet formation process for the first time Astronomers are seeing the final stages of planetary formation and the clearing of protoplanetary dust in a newly formed system for the first time. *Comet 12P Pons Brooks -- the Devil Comet is on its way A Mount Everest-sized comet making its first visit to the inner solar system in more than 70 years could be visible to the naked eye over the next few weeks. *Could fine dust particles have killed the dinosaurs A new study claims that fine dust particles thrown up by the Chicxulub asteroid impact led to the mass extinction event which wiped out 75 percent of all life on Earth including all the non-avian dinosaurs *The Science Report Gene editing has been used to eliminate all traces of HIV. Australia's grey-headed flying-foxes numbers remaining stable The new lithium-sulphur batteries capable of being charged in less than five minutes. Alex on Tech Nvidia’s new H100 super chip.   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 39 *Introducing the Einasto Supercluster – a new heavyweight contender in the universe Astronomers studying some of the largest structures in the known universe have discovered one of the most massive superclusters ever seen. *How humans changed the shape and orbit of an asteroid A new study has shown that the asteroid moon Dimorphos may have been reshaped after it was hit by a spacecraft. *Hubble tracks Jupiter’s stormy weather The giant planet Jupiter, in all its banded glory, has been revisited by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope providing new insights into the king of planet’s ever changing storm fronts *The Science Report Global life expectancy dropped by 1.6 years during the COVID-19 pandemic. The new camera that can see the world as animals see it. It’s confirmed: Dogs learn and understand what their toys are called. Skeptics guide to when kids find out the truth about Santa and the easter bunny.   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://bitesz.com   This week’s guests include: Katarina Miljkovic from Curtin University   The deputy executive director at the Royal Astronomical Society Robert Massey   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life   Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics  
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    1h 21m 52s
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    S27E34-36 Premium: High Stakes at High Altitudes: SpaceX's Starship's Third Flight Odyssey

    18 MAR. 2024 ·  The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 34 *Starship almost aces it’s third test flight The world’s largest and most powerful rocket SpaceX’s Starship superheavy has completed a mostly successful test flight. *Is Voyager 1’s mission over? NASA’s Voyager 1 is the most-distant man-made object in space and is more than 24 billion kilometres away.  However, the first spacecraft to cross into interstellar space is not doing well and its days seem numbered as it’s been sending back incoherent messages to mission managers since November and scientists don’t know why. *Astronomers get a clearer picture of the high energy universe Astronomers have been given a clearer picture of the high energy X-ray sky thanks to the first all-sky survey data released by the eROSITA telescope. *Rocket Lab launches its 45th Electron rocket Rocket Lab has successfully launched its 45th Electron rocket placing another earth observation satellite into orbit. *The Science Report Claims kids in the outer suburbs of Australia’s biggest cities are twice as likely to have asthma. A new study suggests small amount of apple cider vinegar every day may help you lose weight. Scientists show Australian Magpies get their smarts thanks to nurture rather than nature. Skeptics guide the dangers of Hydroxychloroquine.   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 35 *Giant volcano discovered on Mars Scientists have discovered a giant ancient volcano and glacial ice sheet buried in the eastern part of the Martian Tharsis volcanic province, near the planet’s equator. *New radar mission for Europe The European Space Agency are planning a new Earth observation mission to monitor how the planet is changing due to global warming. *A busy time aboard the International Space Station It’s been a busy time aboard the international Space Station with several crews arriving and departing over the last few weeks. *Could a robot chemist create oxygen from the resources already on Mars? Scientists have developed an AI robot chemist that can make oxygen from Martian meteorites. *The Science Report Claims high temperatures immediately increase your risk of having an ischemic stroke. Whales getting stuck in discarded fishing gear wind up with serious lifelong injuries – if they survive. Using Vegemite to pull metals out of water. Alex on Tech Trouble with TikTok and Meta   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 36 *Measuring the exact mass of the biggest neutron stars Astronomers have measured the exact upper mass limit of a non-rotating neutron star a finding that will help scientists better understand the physics and evolution of black holes. *Japan space rocket explodes seconds after launch A company hoping to become Japan’s first privately operated space launch provider has just learnt what they mean when they use the famous phrase Space is Hard. *NASA’s new climate satellite blasts into space NASA’s PACE climate satellite has blasted into orbit to survey oceans and atmosphere of a warming planet in never-before-seen detail. *Downloading NASA’s dark matter data from above the clouds Data from a NASA mission to map dark matter around galaxy clusters has been saved by a new recovery system designed by scientists at the University of Sydney. *The Science Report Climate change’s effect on Arctic Sea ice puts polar bears at risk of starvation. Scientists warn that Humpback whale numbers are crashing in the North Pacific Ocean. A new study shows chocolate originated in the Amazon basin. Skeptics guide to the Peruvian alien mummies   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://bitesz.com   This week’s guests include: Silvia Mantovanini from International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research at Curtin University.   Malcolm Davidson, ROSE-L Mission Scientist,   Nico Gebert, ROSE-L Payload Manager   Gianluigi Di Cosimo, ROSE-L Project Manager.   PACE science lead for Ocean biogeochemistry Ivona Cetinic   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life   Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics   🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordVPN deal here ➼ https://nordvpn.com/stuartgary or use the checkout code STUARTGARY. It’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌
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    1h 27m 19s
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    S27E31-33 Air Premium: Neutron Stars' Collision: Unveiling the Enigma of Axion Particles

    11 MAR. 2024 · Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/spacetime-with-stuart-gary--2458531/support. The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 31 *Astronomers spot oldest ‘dead’ galaxy yet observed Astronomers have found a galaxy that suddenly stopped forming new stars more than 13 billion years ago. *SpaceX eyes March 14 for next Starship test launch Elon Musk's SpaceX is looking at March 14th as the likely earliest date for the third launch attempt of the company’s massive new Starship super heavy rocket. *Optimus satellite launch marks a new era for Australia and satellite servicing Australian based Space Machines Company say their Optimus satellite Servicing Vehicle is safely in orbit and operational. *An astronomer’s highlights for 2024 2024 is proving to be a spectacular year for sky watchers with highlights including next month’s total solar eclipse across North America on April eighth and a series of four super moons in succession on August 20, September 18, October 17, and November 16. *The Science Report The World Meteorological Organisation says the current El Niño is one of the five strongest on record. The antibiotic drug combination that’s showing promising results against hard-to-treat solid tumours. The new gene test strips that rival conventional lab-based tests in quality. Skeptics guide to the haunted painting of the Rain Woman.   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 32 *Juno measures oxygen production on the ice moon Europa NASA’s Juno spacecraft has directly measured charged oxygen and hydrogen molecules from the atmosphere of one of Jupiter’s largest moons, Europa. *New phenomenon challenging textbook definition of white dwarf stars Astronomers have discovered a population of white dwarf stars that have mysteriously stopped cooling. *New clues about Neptune’s evolution A ring of icy rocks orbiting the Sun just beyond Neptune may give astronomers a glimpse of how Neptune — and other objects on the outskirts of the solar system — were formed. *Japan moon lander put to sleep after surviving lunar night Mission managers at JAXA the Japan aerospace exploration agency have placed their lunar lander back into sleep mode after it surprisingly survived the freezing cold lunar night. *The Science Report Most of the world's coral reefs are under threat or have been damaged potentially beyond repair. A new study shows smoking rates are down, vaping is up, and 1 in 5 Australians use drugs illegally. Study shows that global happiness levels take about two weeks to rebound following a global crisis. Alex on Tech Apple release IOS 17.4   SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 33 *Star ripped apart by black hole Astronomers have uncovered the closest recorded occurrence of a star being torn apart by a supermassive black hole. *Astronomers search for new physics in the debris from colliding neutron stars Scientists say neutron star mergers are a treasure trove for new physics, with implications for determining the true nature of dark matter. *Rocky Earth like planets come with Jupiter like bodyguards A new study looking at exoplanetary systems has found that terrestrial Earth like planets is often found in systems which also host Jovian like gas giants. *Taikonauts to be on the Moon before the end of the decade Beijing says it will achieve a manned moon landing before 2030. Central to these efforts is the development of the Long March-10 moon rocket which will be specially designed to carry spacecraft and landers into lunar orbit. *The Science Report Micro plastics found in plaques of more than half of clogged artery patients. The link between extreme heat while pregnant and the likelihood of having a preterm birth. The first half of 2024 likely to see many areas to experience record-breaking air temperatures Skeptic's guide to Science:   https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com  https://bitesz.com   This week’s guests includes: Macquarie University astrophysicist Professor Richard de Grijs Ana Carolina de Souza Feliciano from the University of Central Florida Noemí Pinilla-Alonso from the University of Central Florida Martin Schlecker from the Max Planck Institute   And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics
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    1h 17m 35s
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    S27E28-30 Premium: Navigating the Unknown: Lunar Landings and the Future of Space Exploration

    5 MAR. 2024 · Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/spacetime-with-stuart-gary--2458531/support. The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 28 *Odysseus lunar lander placed into sleep mode Intuitive Machines will place their Odysseus Nova-C lunar lander into sleep mode in the hope of waiting out the 15 Earth Day long lunar night following its sideways touch down last week near the Lunar south pole. *The Atlantic Ocean could start to disappear in 20 million years. A new study suggests the Atlantic may ‘soon’ enter its declining phase. The findings reported in the journal Geology are based on new computational models which predict that a subduction zone currently below the Strait of Gibraltar will propagate further inside the Atlantic Ocean and contribute to forming an Atlantic subduction system – an Atlantic ring of fire. *Three new moons discovered around Uranus and Neptune Astronomers have discovered three tiny new moons orbiting the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. *The Science Report A new study claims zinc could help some people with cystic fibrosis. An investigation has solved the 120 year old maritime mystery of the SS Nemesis. A new study has failed to find any clear link between the weather and back, knee or hip pain. Skeptics guide to the truth behind the Amityville Horror SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 29 *Astronomers detect a new short-period brown dwarf Astronomers have discovered a new brown dwarf orbiting a red dwarf star some 402 light years away. *North America to experience a total solar eclipse next month. The event on April 8th will stretch from Mexico and Texas, through the mid-western US and right over Indianapolis and Cleveland before passing upstate New York and the New England and finally entering Canada at New Brunswick. *Meta-optical elements being tested for space use A new first-of-its-kind engineering study has been commissioned by the European Space Agency to determine the usefulness of meta-optical elements for use in space. *The Science Report Claims a protein in the human immune system can be manipulated to help overcome bowel cancer. Discovery of what could be Europe’s oldest human-made megastructure. ChatGPT-4 Artificial Intelligence program has aced their Turing test. Alex on Tech Sora and Gemini give us two side of the AI coin. SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 30 *Could hypothetical axion stars pinpoint where and what dark matter is Astronomers plan on using the expected characteristics of a hypothetical star to improve their understanding of mysterious dark matter. *The story of Martian ground water New models show little groundwater recharge in ancient Mars aquifer. *Is frying food possible in space? The food we eat determines how we feel, and nothing beats a good fry-up, although in moderation of course. *March Skywatch The March equinox, the constellations Taurus, Leo, Corvus, and Eridanus, and don’t forget Pi Day are among the highlights in the night skies on March Skywatch. https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com https://bitesz.com This week’s guests includes: Navigation Doppler Lidar chief engineer Glen Hines from NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia Eclipse Soundscapes Project chief scientist Henry Winter Eclipse Soundscapes Project co-lead Marykay Severino Eclipse Soundscapes Project acoustic ecologist William Oestreich Natural resource manager Chance Holllzheuser from the Hot Springs National Park. And our regular guests: Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics Jonathan Nally from Sky and Telescope Magazine
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    1h 21m 46s

19 years on Australian Public Radio (as StarStuff), 8 years of podcasting and counting. We have a lot of content to share with you. Recognized worldwide by our listeners and...

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19 years on Australian Public Radio (as StarStuff), 8 years of podcasting and counting. We have a lot of content to share with you.
Recognized worldwide by our listeners and industry experts as one of the best and most thoroughly researched programs on Astronomy, Space, and Science News.
Hosted by Stuart Gary, a veteran radio science reporter, broadcaster and now podcaster.
Keep up-to-date and learn something new with every episode.
New episodes weekly. Three new episodes are published on Mondays for our subscribers and individual episodes publicly on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Show your support for SpaceTime, help us reach our goals with early access to commercial-free episodes and bonuses via Supercast, Patreon, Apple Podcasts and YouTube.
Links at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/about
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