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The Progress Educational Trust podcast

  • 10 Families and Counting: Time for Global Limits on Donor-Created (Half-) Siblings?

    3 JUN. 2024 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast discusses whether there should be limits on the number of people – worldwide – who can be created from the sperm or eggs of the same donor. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Professor Jackson Kirkman-Brown (Chair of the Association of Reproductive and Clinical Scientists) ⚫ Christina Sommerlund (Business Development Manager at Born Donor Bank) ⚫ Kevin Moore (donor-conceived person, also himself a donor) ⚫ Dr Astrid Indekeu (Founder of the Support and Expertise Centre for Families by Donor Conception) ⚫ Dr Grace Halden (Co-Director of the Centre for Medical and Health Humanities at Birkbeck University of London) PET is grateful to the Association of Reproductive and Clinical Scientists for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 34m 7s
  • 40 Years of Egg Donation and Counting: What Have We Learned? What Happens Next?

    13 MAY. 2024 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast marks 40 years since the announcement – in Australia – that a child had been born following egg donation for the first time. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Professor Alan Trounson (IVF pioneer responsible for the first successful egg donation) ⚫ Professor Catherine Mills (Head of the School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies at Monash University) ⚫ Stephen Page (Director of the law firm Page Provan) ⚫ Professor Nicky Hudson (Director of the Centre for Reproduction Research at De Montfort University) November 1983 saw the birth, in Australia, of the world's first ever child conceived with a donor egg. For the first time in human history, it became meaningful to distinguish between a child's 'genetic' and 'gestational' mother. Both the egg donor and the egg recipient were anonymous fertility patients, treated by a team based at Monash University. Announcement of the birth was delayed until January 1984, at the egg recipient's request and also to allow time to confirm the donor's genetic contribution via testing. The team responsible at Monash was headed by the late Professor Carl Wood (1929-2011), together with Professor Alan Trounson. They https://doi.org/10.1038/307174a0 the landmark as 'embryo donation', but because the donor egg was fertilised by sperm from the recipient's husband, what they achieved actually constitutes egg donation in today's terminology. Prior to this, Professors Wood and Trounson and their colleagues had already made https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2018.02.126 to the early development of IVF, working concurrently with the UK team responsible for the https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(78)92957-4. Within weeks of the January 1984 announcement, it was reported that a second child conceived with a donor egg had been born, following https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.1984.03340310011002. Other examples of successful egg donation then followed. In this discussion, Professor Alan Trounson and other experts explore the science, medicine, law and ethics of egg donation, from its beginnings more than 40 years ago to the present day and beyond. PET is grateful to Gedeon Richter UK Ltd for supporting this discussion. Gedeon Richter had no input into the content or speaker selection. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 32m 10s
  • Mary Warnock at 100: The Architect of Embryo Law

    29 ABR. 2024 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast marks the 100th birthday of the late Baroness Mary Warnock. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Felix Warnock (son of the late Baroness Mary Warnock) ⚫ Dr Duncan Wilson (Senior Lecturer at the University of Manchester) ⚫ Professor Anna Mastroianni (Professor of Bioethics and Law at Johns Hopkins University) ⚫ Baroness Ruth Deech (former Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority) ⚫ Julia Chain (current Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority) Baroness Mary Warnock (1924-2019) – philosopher and Patron of PET – led a Government committee whose http://www.hfea.gov.uk/docs/Warnock_Report_of_the_Committee_of_Inquiry_into_Human_Fertilisation_and_Embryology_1984.pdf went on to shape fertility and embryo research law, both in the UK and around the world. In this discussion, speakers including the current and former Chairs of the UK's fertility regulator – the https://www.hfea.gov.uk/ – explore Baroness Warnock's life, work and legacy. PET is grateful to CooperSurgical and the Adelphi Genetics Forum for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 32m 29s
  • Welfare of the Fertility Patient: Spotting Signs and Treatment after Trauma

    25 MAR. 2024 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast discusses how best to understand and address welfare issues in the context of fertility treatment. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Professor Abha Maheshwari (Lead Clinician at Fertility Scotland) ⚫ Ruth Phillips (Fertility Counsellor at the Edinburgh Fertility Centre) ⚫ Dr Susheel Vani (Lead Clinician at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary) ⚫ Nicole McKeith (Fertility Nurse and Nurse Sedationist at Ninewells Hospital) PET is grateful to the Scottish Government for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 29m 42s
  • IVF Add-Ons: How Should We Score the HFEA's New Ratings System?

    26 FEB. 2024 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast discusses recent changes to the way the UK's fertility regulator – the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) – assesses and explains https://www.hfea.gov.uk/treatments/treatment-add-ons/. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Dr Tim Child (Chair of the HFEA's Scientific and Clinical Advances Advisory Committee) ⚫ Professor Joyce Harper (Professor of Reproductive Science at University College London) ⚫ Dr Ippokratis Sarris (Director of King's Fertility) ⚫ Tracey Sainsbury (Fertility Counsellor) ⚫ Dr Tasha Alden (patient and researcher) Add-ons are optional treatments, technologies or procedures offered alongside IVF – often at considerable expense to patients – which may not be supported by reliable evidence. The HFEA regulates all UK fertility clinics, including those that offer add-ons, but tends to regulate the add-ons themselves only indirectly. This is because the HFEA's https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1990/37/contents concern what can be done to or with gametes or embryos outside the human body, and many add-ons fall outside this scope. The HFEA's other main role in relation to add-ons is providing information for patients and the wider public, explaining what particular add-ons entail and whether there is evidence to support their use. In 2019, the HFEA https://www.hfea.gov.uk/about-us/news-and-press-releases/2019/fertility-regulator-calls-for-clinics-to-be-more-open-about-treatment-add-ons/ a 'traffic light' ratings system, placing add-ons in one of three categories depending on the quality of evidence. In recent months, the HFEA has https://www.hfea.gov.uk/about-us/news-and-press-releases/2023/uk-fertility-regulator-launches-improved-ratings-for-fertility-treatment-add-ons/ its ratings system, replacing its three previous categories for add-ons with https://www.hfea.gov.uk/treatments/treatment-add-ons/#what-do-the-ratings-mean. These new categories involve criteria including the quality of evidence, the impact on treatment outcome, and concerns about safety. Anyone who thinks the regulator's list of add-ons is incomplete can https://portal.hfea.gov.uk/knowledge-base/other-guidance/apply-to-propose-a-treatment-for-inclusion-in-the-hfea-s-traffic-light-rated-list-of-add-ons/. PET is grateful to the British Fertility Society for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 35m 1s
  • Fertility Treatment for Single People: Who Should Pay?

    25 ENE. 2024 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast discusses whether – and in what circumstances – single people should be able to access publicly funded fertility treatment. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Dr Sarah Martins da Silva (Clinical Lead for Fertility Services at NHS Tayside) ⚫ Dr Alan Brown (Senior Lecturer in Private Law at the University of Glasgow) ⚫ Dr Catherine Jones (Lecturer at King's College London) ⚫ Professor Guido Pennings (Director, Bioethics Institute Ghent) PET is grateful to the Scottish Government for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 12m 35s
  • Innovation from the Pandemic: From Video Appointments to Electronic Consent

    30 OCT. 2023 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast discusses technologies and approaches that helped fertility patients and practitioners during the COVID-19 pandemic, and that are still proving useful now. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Dr Ashleigh Holt-Kentwell (Clinical Research Fellow at Aberdeen Fertility Centre) ⚫ Ciara Heatherwick (Specialist Nurse at Glasgow Royal Infirmary) ⚫ Lesley Benzie (Fertility Counsellor at Glasgow Royal Infirmary) ⚫ Alison Elliot (Fertility Counsellor at Glasgow Royal Infirmary) ⚫ George Hughes (Lead Clinical Embryologist at Ninewells Hospital's Assisted Conception Unit) ⚫ Dave Wales (Quality Manager at the Edinburgh Fertility Centre) Fertility treatment was – like many other areas of healthcare – drastically disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic, causing difficulties for patients and professionals alike. However, the pandemic also prompted creative solutions and novel approaches, some of which are still proving useful now. In this discussion, a cross-section of fertility professionals – a Clinical Research Fellow, a Specialist Nurse, two Fertility Counsellors, a Clinical Embryologist and a Quality Manager – discuss what has been learned from the pandemic, and the scope for further innovation. PET is grateful to the Scottish Government for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 30m 18s
  • Opening the Register: How to Handle Disclosure of Gamete Donor Information

    9 OCT. 2023 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast discusses an imminent change that will have consequences for people involved in – and affected by – donor conception. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Rachel Cutting (Director of Compliance and Information at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority) ⚫ Laura Bridgens (donor-conceived person, and Director of Donor Conceived UK) ⚫ Rebekah Dundas (mother of three donor-conceived children) ⚫ Nina Barnsley (Director of the Donor Conception Network) In October 2023, some people who were conceived from donor gametes in the UK – where the relevant sperm or eggs were donated after the https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/1511/contents/made came into force – will reach the age of 18. From this point forward, a growing number of donor-conceived people will be officially entitled to https://www.hfea.gov.uk/donation/donor-conceived-people-and-their-parents/finding-out-about-your-donor-and-genetic-siblings/ – the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) – for their donor's full name, date of birth, and last known address. The HFEA has https://www.hfea.gov.uk/about-us/news-and-press-releases/2023-news-and-press-releases/fresh-plea-from-uk-fertility-regulator-as-monumental-changes-to-donor-anonymity-law-finally-come-to-fruition/ to raise awareness of the changing situation, and to encourage relevant donors to ensure that they are contactable. This entails the donor providing up-to-date contact details to the clinic where they donated 18 or more years ago (if that clinic still exists), and/or providing these details to the HFEA. In this discussion a donor-conceived person, a parent of donor-conceived children, and representatives of the HFEA and the Donor Conception Network discuss practical, personal and ethical aspects of disclosing donor information. PET is grateful to the Scottish Government for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 34m 7s
  • Small Change: Is It Time to Reconsider Compensation for Gamete Donors?

    2 OCT. 2023 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast discusses levels of compensation for donors of sperm or eggs. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Nayla Tohme (Patient Engagement Officer at the London Egg Bank) ⚫ Hayley King (donor-conceived person, also herself a mother of twins conceived with donor sperm) ⚫ Saghar Kasiri (Director of European Operations at Cryos International) ⚫ Dr Ben Hurlbut (Associate Professor of Bioscience Ethics at Arizona State University) What levels of compensation – financial or otherwise – should be standard, and permissible, for gamete donors? The UK's fertility regulator, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), last addressed this question in 2011. Following a public consultation, the HFEA decided that donors could receive fixed sums of money (this had not been permitted previously), with a maximum of £35 per clinic visit for sperm donors and a maximum of £750 per cycle of donation for egg donors. The HFEA arrived at these figures after reviewing policies in 15 other European countries, taking particular inspiration from Danish policy (for sperm donor compensation) and Spanish policy (for egg donor compensation). The maximum payments set in 2011 remain in place in the https://portal.hfea.gov.uk/media/it1n3vpo/2022-07-01-code-of-practice-2021.pdf of the HFEA's Code of Practice (CoP). The CoP also permits https://www.hfea.gov.uk/donation/donors/egg-sharing/ and sperm sharing arrangements, stating that clinics 'may offer benefits in kind, in the form of reduced-price or free licensed services (for example, fertility treatment or storage) or quicker access to those services, in return for providing eggs or sperm for the treatment of others'. 12 years on, should compensation for gamete donors be reconsidered, to take account of inflation and the cost-of-living crisis? Importantly, those who donate gametes in the UK are only officially permitted to receive 'compensation' for their donation, as distinct from 'payment'. This distinction was originally a requirement of the https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=celex:32004L0023 of 2004, which stipulates that 'member states shall endeavour to ensure voluntary and unpaid donations of tissues and cells' and that 'donors may receive compensation, which is strictly limited to making good the expenses and inconveniences related to the donation'. Now that the UK has left the European Union, it might be asked whether the UK is still bound by this particular requirement – and if it is, whether it should be. PET is grateful to the Association of Reproductive and Clinical Scientists and the British Fertility Society for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 32m 40s
  • The Women's Health Strategy

    28 JUL. 2023 · This episode of the https://www.spreaker.com/show/progress-educational-trust-podcast discusses the progress that the UK Government has made to date with its Women's Health Strategy for England. The discussion is chaired by Sarah Norcross (Director of PET), with contributions from: ⚫ Professor Geeta Nargund (Co-Founder and Medical Adviser at Ginsburg Women's Health Board) ⚫ Nickie Aiken (Member of Parliament for the Cities of London and Westminster) ⚫ Isaac Barnswell (Research and Policy Officer at Stonewall) ⚫ Laura-Rose Thorogood (Founder of LGBT Mummies) ⚫ Dr Raj Mathur (Lead for Reproductive Medicine at St Mary's Hospital) In July 2022, the UK Government published the first ever https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/womens-health-strategy-for-england. The section of the Strategy that deals with fertility and pregnancy includes Government commitments to: ⚫ 'Work with NHS England to review and address the current geographical variation in access to NHS-funded fertility services across England to ensure all NHS fertility services are commissioned in a clinically justifiable way.' ⚫ 'Explore mechanisms to publish data nationally on provision and availability of IVF' and 'improve information provision regarding fertility over the next two years'. ⚫ 'Remove non-clinical access criteria to fertility treatment, such as one partner having a child from a previous relationship, to create more equality in access to fertility services.' ⚫ Ensure that when it comes to same-sex couples, 'there is no requirement for self-funding and the NHS treatment pathway for female same-sex couples will start with six cycles of artificial insemination, prior to accessing IVF services if necessary'. The Government Minister responsible for the Women's Health Strategy, Maria Caulfield, https://hansard.parliament.uk/commons/2023-01-24/debates/1282DF98-F596-4EE2-BD69-F694378D6700/Women%E2%80%99SHealthStrategyForEngland#contribution-62C072A2-021B-42E1-B4D1-A406D76CE523 in January 2023 that the Government's 'eight priorities for this year' in relation to the Strategy include 'improving and standardising access to in vitro fertilisation for same-sex couples around the country'. In July 2023, the same Minister https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2023-06-26/191157/, saying: 'We will improve access to IVF by removing the additional financial burden on female same-sex couples accessing treatment. We will be working with NHS England to assess fertility provision across ICBs, with a view to removing non-clinical access criteria. We will also work with stakeholders to improve information provision on fertility and fertility treatments, including on the NHS website, and introduce greater transparency of the local provision of IVF.' This discussion asks what progress has been made with the Strategy, and what can be done to ensure that the Government honours its commitments. PET is grateful to the British Fertility Society and Merck for supporting this discussion. PET is also grateful to Jon Nicoll, who created the opening and closing music for its podcast. Register at https://www.progress.org.uk/events/upcoming-events/ for upcoming PET events.
    1h 37m 33s

PET (the Progress Educational Trust) is an independent charity that improves choices for people affected by infertility and genetic conditions. On this podcast, you can hear the latest PET discussions...

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PET (the Progress Educational Trust) is an independent charity that improves choices for people affected by infertility and genetic conditions.

On this podcast, you can hear the latest PET discussions of scientific, ethical, legal and policy issues in fertility, genetics, genomics and embryo/stem cell research.

These discussions feature experts and advocates from around the world, as well as contributions from patients and the broader public.
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